Home » Posts tagged 'King Solomon'

Tag Archives: King Solomon

My last post — not my last post

If you’ve been following this blog, please accept my warm appreciation for allowing me to share my thoughts and insights.

If you would like to continue receiving these updates, please follow the link to my new site and scroll down to the bottom of the page to renew your subscription:  https://www.yonasongoldson.com/

New look, same articles, videos, and posts grappling with the challenges of calibrating our moral compass and seeking clarity and courage in the battle against ego and the evils of self-deception.

I hope to see you there.  Thanks again.

Fighting the next civil war

It happened when John F. Kennedy appeared at his presidential inauguration without a hat.  One instant of astonishment, followed by men’s hats instantaneously dropping out of style.

It happened when Michelle Obama began appearing sleeveless as First Lady.  A few days of disdain and mockery from the right, after which virtually every female commentator on Fox News had shed her sleeves.

And currently, it has happened with Donald Trump’s unfiltered attacks on anyone who dares to question or oppose him.  After excoriating the president for his vitriol and divisiveness, his detractors on the left have used the exact same tactics in their campaign against him.

This has nothing to do with taking sides.

Click to read the rest.

Reasoning with Unreasonable People

Events on the Korean peninsula have been a source of anxiety for a long time. But the precarious game of nuclear brinkmanship turned momentarily farcical last May, when the newly elected government of South Korea condemned North Korea for dashing hopes of peace by conducting its second ballistic missile test in a week.

In other news, expectations for perpetual motion, bi-partisan government, and the end of world hunger were also shattered. The culprit was that relentless and uncompromising bugaboo known as reality.

On October 11, 2002, former President Jimmy Carter received the Nobel Peace Prize, in large part for his role negotiating a treaty in which North Korea agreed to suspend its nuclear weapons program. On October 16, just five days later, the United States announced that North Korea admitted to having a clandestine program to enrich uranium for nuclear weapons.

One can’t help but reflect on the classic scene in Casablanca when Claude Rains declares being “shocked, shocked to find that gambling is going on” — as the concierge is handing him his winnings.

Click here to read the rest.

If I forget thee

The UN vote is about more than Jerusalem and about more than an embassy

It’s depressing to have to state the obvious.  But it’s too maddening to remain silent.  So please forgive me if I revisit what many have said but few have heard.

Last week’s United Nations vote – which censured the United States for planning to relocate its embassy to Jerusalem – is a pitch-perfect example of human society’s collective descent into tribalism.  And the heart of the matter has nothing to do with Jerusalem, the Mideast, or American foreign policy.

One could reasonably make the case that moving the embassy is ill-advised.  I have had my own doubts whether or not the benefits of the largely symbolic gesture outweigh the potential for violent Palestinian reaction.

But that was not the stated reason behind the U.N. resolution.

Instead, leaders and pundits the world around claimed that the move will derail the peace process.  And to that, the logical retort is:  what peace process?

In the 53 years since the establishment of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (which preceded the Six Day War and Israel’s so-called “occupation” of the West Bank), the only concession offered up by the Palestinian Authority has been to remove from its charter the call for Israel’s destruction.

Thanks, guys.

The concession to stop publicly advocating the extermination of 6 million Israeli Jews was a good first step, not a final offer.  Negotiation requires compromise, as Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak demonstrated back in 2000 when he offered to return 94% of the West Bank – an offer the P.A. refused.  Since then, the only progress has been Israel’s withdrawal from Gaza, to which the P.A. responded by launching missiles against Israeli civilians.

So exactly what “process” does the international community think has been derailed?

PSYCHOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY

Even more absurd is denouncing the U.S. embassy move as “illegal.”  The whole world has recognized Israel’s ownership of West Jerusalem since 1947.  So why should any country not be allowed to name its own capital in its own land?  And why should any other country be censured for establishing its embassy in a legal foreign capital?  Finally, why should longtime allies join the chorus of condemnation with absolutely no legal or moral justification?

The first two questions are merely rhetorical.  It is the third question that really needs answering. Are you listening, Europe and Canada?

There are two explanations.  First is the irrational Utopianism that characterizes much of the political left.  Like the delusional naturalists who believe that grizzly bears and mountain lions are really peaceful creatures who will respond to human gestures of affection in kind, radical progressives fantasize that terrorists and the sponsors of terror will eagerly embrace peace once the rest of us confess our sins and beg for absolution.

It hasn’t worked yet.  But the Utopians have faith, even as they remain blind and deaf to the irrefutable evidence that they themselves have become the enablers of terrorism.  For all their good intentions, they have prolonged suffering on all sides by allowing corrupt Palestinian leaders to squander hundreds of millions in international aid on terror tunnels rather than easing the plight of their own people.

The second reason is that western governments are terrified that any sign of support for Israel will spark violent uprisings among their restless Arab minorities.  It’s a disappointing fact of life that the politics of cowardice almost always trump commitment to justice.

THE HEART OF THE MATTER

The more fundamental problem, however, is the unapologetic disregard for truth.

 

Think whatever you want and believe whatever you want – but defend your positions with facts and logic, not disinformation and distortion.  Once reasoned debate and civil discourse become impossible – whether because of ideology or fear – civilization is sure to crumble beneath our feet.

Truth be told, it’s possible that by showing the Palestinian Authority that intransigence will no longer serve their interests, the U.S. has actually moved the peace process a step forward.  If other countries begin to follow America’s example, the PA will be left scrambling to make a deal before they have no more chips left to bargain.

King Solomon says, One who trusts his own heart is a fool, but one who walks in wisdom shall be kept safe.

If we truly hope to bring about peace, we have cast off our rose-colored glasses and confront our fear.  Only then might we achieve the intellectual and moral integrity that will allow us to follow in the ways of wise counsel.

Published by Jewish World Review

Leadership Lessons from the Friendly Skies

Fashions change, and so do standards. John F. Kennedy attended his presidential inauguration without a hat, and instantly hats fell out of style. Female attire that’s perfectly acceptable today would have landed a woman in jail a century ago.

But there’s a difference between styles and standards. A relaxed dress code may work in the offices of Facebook and Google, but conventional businesses find that productivity drops off when executives drop their office shirts, skirts, and slacks.

So if United airlines wants to hold its employees to a more formal standard of attire when they’re flying as a corporate perk, perhaps the company should have been applauded for its professionalism.

And if that requires family members who fly on non-revenue tickets to spruce up a bit, is that such a high price to pay?

Well, you’d certainly think so after the twitterstorm that engulfed the carrier earlier this year. And since it’s the season for New Year’s resolutions, let’s think back to last March, when an uninformed bystander jumped to conclusions and — rather than investigating to get her facts straight — tried and convicted United in the court of public opinion.

Click here to read the rest.

Why Ethics Matter, Part 6: Change Reality by Accepting Reality

What are Ethics?  2 minute video

“It’s impossible.”

How many times have you heard that — or said it yourself — when it clearly wasn’t true? When we don’t want to face reality, to accept responsibility, or to face accountability, we assert that reality must be what we want it to be and can’t be anything else.

If we aren’t prepared to face reality, we can’t be ethical, and we certainly can’t solve our problems or anyone else’s.  So what do we do about it? The answer is here:

The Ethics of Ransomware

It was Joseph Tainter who warned that the more complex our society becomes, the more vulnerable we are. This became painfully obvious when hundreds of thousands of ransomware victims around the world faced the prospect of having to pay extortion money to get back the use of their own computers.

Some of the victims were corporations. But others were hospitals, whose patients lives were endangered by the virus that crippled emergency and diagnostic equipment.

This raises all kinds of ethical questions:

Click to read the whole article.